Various type of SUSHI

Sushi is not only one of the bast-loved dishes in Japan, but is also extremely popular in many places abroad.

Osaka’s contribution to the sushi scene is oshizushi.

Sushi rice and seafood, mostly cooked, are pressed in a rectangular box and then cut into slices.

Osaka is especially famous for its battera, a pressed sushi of mackerel.

Kyoto is also famous for its mackerel sushi (saba no bozushi, for which see also sabazushi),

which, however, is not pressed but shaped in a makisu.

The top quality (but only the top) can be very good indeed.

The makisu, which is a mat made of long thin slivers of bamboo for rolling things up,

is also and mainly used for making makizushi.

Makizushi is a great standby for almost every occasion, and is not expensive,

since a minimum of fish is used, or none at all.

Quite thin types of makizushi may have just a cucumber filling (kappamaki) or tuna (tekkamaki).

Great fat ones are stuffed with kanpyo, mitsuba, koyadofu, mushrooms, and omelet,

and their very lavishness maked them look inviting.

The filling is rolled up in a sheet of nori.

Gunkanmaki is a kind of nigirizushi in which a topping of ikura or uni

is prevented from falling off by a strip of nori around the sides.

With chirashizushi,

sometimes called barazushi, both meaning ”scattered, ” or gomokuzushi,

literally five-item sushi, the topping is scattered (usually quite artfully)

on top of a bed of sushi rice.

The color combination is important to make the dish look attractive,

so there is usually a sprinkling of denbu to add a splash of red.

Shredded omelet contributes yellow, and green may well appear in the form of green peas.

Chopsticks are needed to eat chirashizushi.

Gunkanmaki is a kind of nigirizushi in which a topping of ikura or uni

is prevented from falling off by a strip of nori around the sides.